Crisis Recovery: Speak Out on Social Media

A stronger tomorrow begins with a society where women and families can not only survive—but thrive.

As women continue to bear a disproportionate burden of the ongoing crises harming our country, they need bold measures now. Americans need access to good jobs, affordable health care, high quality child care, and educational opportunities that prepare them for tomorrow’s jobs. But this can only be achieved by addressing a crumbling infrastructure that extends beyond bridges and roads. There is no one answer that will achieve recovery success for everyone—we must focus on all facets of life in order to move toward a more secure tomorrow.

We need strong and informed advocates to use their voice to ensure that women and families are kept at the center of crisis recovery.

This is where you come in.

Keeping up with the many pressing issues and proposed solutions can be difficult—your voice can make a difference in motivating people in your community & advocating for critical policies nationwide.

Getting Started

Social media has proven to be a great tool for sharing your message with diverse audiences across multiple platforms. As our nation continues to battle the COVID-19 crisis, online engagement has become more crucial now than ever before. With a well-crafted tweet or Facebook post, you can raise awareness about AAUW issues and spotlight your efforts in the fight for crisis recovery measures that will build a stronger future for all.

  1. Use the right hashtags. Include relevant hashtags like #investinwomen, #COVID19, #crisisrecovery, #AmericanJobsPlan and #AmericanFamiliesPlan in all your social media posts for greater visibility. Take it a step further, target your hashtag to a particular issue to really connect with what is at stake (#raisethewage, #careeconomy, #childcare, #paidleave, #unemployment).
  2. Use photos. Tweets with images perform five times better than those without, and good photos are priceless on all social media platforms. We encourage photos from your own life that are relevant and showcase your advocacy.
  3. Tag @AAUW! We look forward to sharing your content and recognizing your hard work. Make sure to follow AAUW on the following social platforms:
    • Facebook: AAUW and AAUW Action Fund
    • Twitter: @AAUW and @AAUWActionFund
    • Instagram: @AAUWnational

 

Sample Posts

  • The goal for a stronger tomorrow: to ensure a society where women and families can not only survive—but thrive. Our country cannot wait any longer for #crisisrecovery to focus on #womenintheworkforce. Pass bold measures now! @AAUW https://aauw.us/crisisrecovery
  • If Americans are to succeed, we need access to good jobs, affordable #healthcare, #paidleave, high quality #childcare, and educational opportunities that prepare us for tomorrow’s jobs. Congress must invest in our future! @AAUW https://aauw.us/crisisrecovery
  • Women hold the majority of part-time jobs and make up the majority of the low-wage workforce. Many lack basic benefits like paid #sickleave, #familyleave, & workplace #healthcare and #retirement plans. To invest in #crisisrecovery, we must #investinwomen! @AAUW
  • Women have been on the frontlines of the #COVID19 since the beginning: losing the most jobs, struggling to find #childcare, & being pushed out of the workforce altogether — and we cannot wait any longer. Pass #crisisrecovery measures that center women & families now! @AAUW https://aauw.us/crisisrecovery

 

Talking Points

  • At the start of 2020, women comprised half of the full-time labor force in our nation for the first time in the last decade. Three-quarters of moms are in the labor force, more than half of whom are the primary breadwinners for their families.
  • Since the start of the COVID-19 crisis, women have lost more than 5.3 million jobs and account for over half of net job losses. Women of color have been disproportionately impacted.
  • Black women, Latinas, and other women of color are especially likely to be on the front lines of the crisis, risking their lives in jobs in health care, child care, and grocery stores; they are also being paid less than their male counterparts on average.
  • Over half of mothers who left their jobs during the pandemic reportedly did so because their child’s school or daycare closed, and 1.5 million mothers are still reported missing from the workforce.
  • Lost earnings due to the wage gap not only leave women without a financial cushion to weather the current crisis, but also make it harder for them to build wealth, contributing to racial and gender wealth gaps and creating barriers to families’ economic prosperity.
  • If Americans are to succeed, we need access to good jobs, affordable health care, high quality child care, and educational opportunities that prepare us for tomorrow’s jobs. But this can only be achieved by addressing a crumbling infrastructure that extends beyond bridges and roads.
  • There is no one answer that will achieve recovery success for everyone—we must address all facets of life in order to move towards a secure tomorrow. This means when we look to improve employment opportunities for women, we must also expand the services and systems required to support them.
  • I/we urge all members of Congress to enact bold measures that center women in crisis recovery. We must build a society where women and families can not only survive—but thrive.

Want to engage more?

Check out our full list of advocacy actions to ensure that a stronger tomorrow includes the critical services women and families need today.

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There are lots of ways to get involved with AAUW’s work to advance gender equity. Together, we can make a difference in the lives of women and girls.