Four girls practice critical thinking skills at a Tech Savvy workshop.

AAUW to Receive $250,000 Grant for STEM Programming from Alcoa Foundation

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Media Contacts: Lisa Goodnight, goodnightl@aauw.org 202.785.7738 Suzanne van de Raadt, suzanne.vanderaadt@alcoa.com 212.836.2662   Organization announces new collaboration to invest in girls and communities WASHINGTON – The American […] Read more »

Article   |   Education   |   February 19, 2014
Electronics workshop

Bringing STEM Education to Girls across the Globe — from Ohio to Hungary

Thanks to a $250,000 grant, AAUW will expand our successful STEM programs for girls to new sites in Székesfehérvár, Hungary, and Barberton, Ohio, where Alcoa has operations. Read more »

Article   |   Education   |   February 19, 2014
Four girls stand together holding engineered car models.

4 Ways to Introduce the Girl in Your Life to Engineering

What can you, as a parent or sister or scout leader or whatever, do to introduce the girl in your life to engineering? We have some ideas. Read more »

Blog   |   Education   |   2 Comments   |   February 11, 2014
Melroy and Whitson shake hands in the ISS.

When Pam Melroy Was Born, Women Astronauts Didn’t Exist. She Still Became One.

Melroy is one of only two women to have ever commanded the space shuttle. All told, she’s spent 6,924 hours (about 288 days) above Earth. Read more »

Blog   |   Career and Workplace   |   February 05, 2014
1963 AAUW Achievement Award winner Helen Taussig Taussig was a pioneer in pediatric cardiology.

The Founder of Pediatric Cardiology Couldn’t Hear a Heartbeat

February is American Heart Month, and today we’re remembering the founder of pediatric cardiology, Helen Taussig. Taussig developed the procedure known as the Blalock-Taussig shunt, which has saved the lives of countless children who had “blue baby syndrome.” Read more »

1966 Dougherty thumbnail

Cleared for Take-Off … Flying Time to Full Recognition, 34 years!

Despite performing critical military functions, WASPs were always considered civilians and, therefore, received no military benefits. When pilot Dora Dougherty went on to continue her education, she did so without the benefits of the G.I. Bill, unlike male veterans. Read more »

Blog   |   Community   |   January 30, 2014
A black-and-white photo showing German tanks rolling through the streets of Copenhagen

From Nazi-Occupied Denmark to the Labs of 4 Nobel Laureates

Just days before the Nazis invaded Denmark, Hilde Levi escaped in a rowboat to Sweden. She went on to work with four different scientists who later won Nobel prizes for their research. Read more »

Blog   |   Community   |   3 Comments   |   January 08, 2014
ExperimentatTechTrek

Girls Shouldn’t Feel Weird for Loving Science and Math

“Tech Trek was the first time I didn’t have male classmates looking down on me or making me feel weird for loving science and math,” says Ellen Thuy Le, a recent chemical engineering graduate from Stanford University. Read more »

Blog   |   Education   |   8 Comments   |   December 23, 2013
A grouop of girls pose for a photo is goofy orange hats.

Hour of Code Success Calls for a High Five

This year AAUW celebrated Computer Science Education Week and the Hour of Code for the first time. But thanks to amazing work by our members and supporters, you would think we’ve been doing this for much longer. Here’s what we accomplished together Read more »

Article   |   Education   |   December 18, 2013
A black-and-white photograph of Jonas Salk in a lab coat holding a needle for vaccination

Jonas Salk, Polio Vaccine Inventor, Wrote Us a Letter

In Helen Claudia Henry’s 1955–56 International Fellowship file, I came across two letters written by Jonas Salk, the virologist who discovered the polio vaccine. Read more »

Blog   |   Community   |   1 Comments   |   December 17, 2013