A black-and-white photo of Brunauer at a writing desk

On McCarthy’s Blacklist: Celebrating AAUW and Women’s History

In his notorious five-hour speech in 1950, Sen. Joseph McCarthy accused AAUW member Esther Brunauer of being “instrumental in committing this organization to the support of various [communist] front enterprises.” Brunauer and her husband, like many of their peers at the time, were named as security risks and dismissed from their positions. Read more »

Blog   |   Community   |   2 Comments   |   March 17, 2014

Beyond Camping and Cookies: AAUW and the Girl Scouts

This week, we celebrate Girl Scout Week. Maybe you were a Girl Scout yourself, or perhaps you have one in your family. Or you may just love those cookies! But […] Read more »

Blog   |   Community   |   March 11, 2014

Opening Membership and Minds

On display at the AAUW national office is a certificate from the National Council of Negro Women, signed by the council’s founder and president, Mary McLeod Bethune. The story behind this certificate is one of the most significant stories in AAUW’s history. Read more »

Blog   |   Community   |   2 Comments   |   February 28, 2014
Black and white girl students in an old classroom

It Didn’t End with Brown v. Board: The Uphill Battle for School Desegregation

After the landmark Brown v. Board civil rights case, many schools struggled with the adjustment to desegregation — and some states even tried to write laws around it. AAUW member Guion Griffis Johnson played a crucial role in desegregating North Carolina’s schools. Read more »

Blog   |   Community   |   1 Comments   |   February 18, 2014
A black-and-white photo of a group of women teachers

Developing the World’s Teachers: AAUW’s African Educators Program

Established in 1962, the African Educators Program gave African women educators — mostly high school teachers — professional development opportunities in the United States to address the shortage of teachers in many African countries at the time. Read more »

Blog   |   Education   |   2 Comments   |   February 13, 2014
A black-and-white photograph of Lura Beam

Bringing Art to America

In the 1940s, AAUW’s Lura Beam headed a series of traveling art exhibits that brought Roods, Kollwitzes, Hartleys, and reproductions of Picassos to communities across the country. Read more »

Blog   |   Community   |   February 10, 2014
1963 AAUW Achievement Award winner Helen Taussig Taussig was a pioneer in pediatric cardiology.

The Founder of Pediatric Cardiology Couldn’t Hear a Heartbeat

February is American Heart Month, and today we’re remembering the founder of pediatric cardiology, Helen Taussig. Taussig developed the procedure known as the Blalock-Taussig shunt, which has saved the lives of countless children who had “blue baby syndrome.” Read more »

Cleared for Take-Off … Flying Time to Full Recognition, 34 years!

Despite performing critical military functions, WASPs were always considered civilians and, therefore, received no military benefits. When pilot Dora Dougherty went on to continue her education, she did so without the benefits of the G.I. Bill, unlike male veterans. Read more »

Blog   |   Community   |   January 30, 2014
A black and white photo of a reading circle. The children are all sitting with books around their teacher listening to something she's saying.

Education: An Antidote to Poverty

In 1965, AAUW introduced a two-year program studying the potential of education to eradicate poverty. It was our very own War on Poverty, fought entirely by women. Read more »

Blog   |   Community   |   1 Comments   |   January 16, 2014
Pearl Buck

Finding “Mrs. Richard J. Walsh”: Pearl S. Buck’s Journey Back into Our History

Most people know Pearl S. Buck (1892 –1973) as the Pulitzer Prize- and Nobel Prize-winning author who lived in China as a missionary and whose experiences there influenced her writing. But did you know that she was also an AAUW member, unrecognized in our archives for years under her married name? Read more »

Blog   |   Community   |   January 13, 2014