Grace Murray Hopper stands in Navy uniform in front of an American flag.

Before Gates and Jobs, There Was Admiral Grace Murray Hopper

Grace Murray Hopper is perhaps best known for writing the computer language known as COBOL or Common Business-Oriented Language. She also coined the term “computer bug,” was a Navy admiral, and won the 1983 AAUW Achievement Award. Read more »

Blog   |   Community   |   3 Comments   |   December 04, 2013
radio

Is AAUW Older Than You Are? Yes, and a Lot of Other Things, Too.

When you’ve been around for a while — 132 years, to be exact — you find that longevity has its perks. You get to brag about all the amazing people […] Read more »

Blog   |   Community   |   November 29, 2013
Marion Talbot rows a canoe at her New Hampshire home, summer 1928. AAUW archives

An Untold Slice of History, 132 Years Later

On November 28, AAUW celebrates our birthday. Can you guess how old we are? 132 years old! How many organizations can say they have lasted for as long as we […] Read more »

Article   |   Leadership   |   November 25, 2013
AAUW member Judge Sarah Hughes (left) swears in Lyndon B. Johnson as Jackie Kennedy and others watch. November 22, 1963.  (Image by Cecil Stoughton, White House Photo Office. Courtesy of LBJ Presidential Library, Austin)

Sarah T. Hughes: A Woman Who Asked What She Could Do For Her Country

The day was November 22, 1963. The accident was President John F. Kennedy’s assassination. And the plane was Air Force One, where Sarah Tilghman Hughes swore in the new president of the United States, Lyndon B. Johnson. Read more »

Blog   |   Community   |   1 Comments   |   November 21, 2013
Mankiller graces the cover of the Spring 1993 “AAUW Outlook.” AAUW Archives

Wilma Mankiller, the Inspiring First Woman Cherokee Chief

In 1993, AAUW gave our highest honor, the Achievement Award, to Wilma Mankiller. Mankiller, the first woman chief of the Cherokee Nation, was recognized for her contributions toward improving the lives of the Cherokee people. Read more »

Blog   |   Community   |   1 Comments   |   November 20, 2013
AAUW members with President John F. Kennedy as he signs the Equal Pay Act into law on June 10, 1963.

7 AAUW Memories of Camelot

Friday, November 22, marks the 50th anniversary of the tragic assassination of President John F. Kennedy. When asked, those old enough to remember usually recall where they were and what they were doing when they heard the terrible news. The assassination of the nation’s beloved president became a defining moment for the nation and for individuals across the globe. Read more »

Article   |   Community   |   November 18, 2013
McClintock on Graduate Woman

C’mon, We’ve Been at This Forever! (132 Years, to Be Exact)

If AAUW’s founders were alive today, no doubt they would be thrilled about women in science making national news! Then again, perhaps AAUW members of yore would not be surprised to see some of the same women they supported featured in the New York Times. After all, AAUW has been recognizing and supporting women in science since our inception in 1881. Read more »

Article   |   Career and Workplace   |   November 15, 2013
Mabel Newcomer receiving the 1953 AAUW Achievement Award

Where Are the Women Economists? Here’s One You Should Know About

AAUW board member Mabel Newcomer was an economics professor at Vassar College for 40 years and vice president of the American Economic Association — the first woman to hold the position. She was also a published author, an economic adviser for postwar reconstruction in Europe, a U.N. representative, and a 1953 AAUW Achievement Award winner. Read more »

Blog   |   Community   |   November 06, 2013
Black and white portrait photos of six of the women

Just the Tip of the Iceberg: 7 Amazing AAUW Members Who Were Elected to Congress

A recent poll presents a depressing statistic: Only 43 percent of Americans believe it would be a good thing if more women were in Congress. So, on this Election Day, […] Read more »

Blog   |   Leadership   |   November 05, 2013
Dixy Lee Ray sits in a chair facing the camera.

From Mt. Rainier to the Governorship of Washington, Dixy Lee Ray Was a Climber

A competitive go-getter from childhood, Dixy Lee Ray became the youngest girl to climb Mount Rainier (at the time) at age 12. Along with the AAUW Achievement Award, Ray was also awarded the prestigious John Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Award for biology, received 20 honorary degrees, and was named one of the 100 distinguished Washington citizens selected to commemorate the state’s centennial in 1989. Read more »

Blog   |   Community   |   October 31, 2013