Suzanne Gould

Suzanne Gould is AAUW’s archivist and records manager. She has earned graduate degrees in women’s history and library science and has been working in the archives field for 20 years. Suzanne preserves AAUW’s records and enjoys sharing stories about the many fascinating women and events in AAUW’s history.

Why Archives Matter: The Importance of Preserving Your AAUW History

AAUW state or branch history is a valuable resource. Whether you are working with your state or branch archival collection or conducting oral history interviews with fellow members, these guides are helpful at all stages of your project. Read more »

  |     |   April 01, 2014
Mary Emma Woolley in a cap and gown

Mary Emma Woolley, a Champion of Unlimited Possibilities

Mary Emma Woolley was the first woman to graduate from Brown University and, in her 30s, became one of the youngest presidents ever of Mount Holyoke College — not bad for a woman living in an era where going to college was still considered highly controversial (if not outright banned) for women. Read more »

Blog   |   Community   |   1 Comments   |   March 31, 2014
A black and white photo of a woman standing on the stoops of a building that is covered in ivy cut around a plackard that says American Association of University Women

A One-Woman Crusade for Justice

Althea Kratz Hottel’s career reads like a true success story in academia. Spending most of her career in some way affiliated with the University of Pennsylvania, she became the university’s first dean of women, not to mention the first female ever to hold the position of dean on the campus. Read more »

Blog   |   Leadership   |   1 Comments   |   March 21, 2014
A black-and-white photo of Brunauer at a writing desk

On McCarthy’s Blacklist: Celebrating AAUW and Women’s History

In his notorious five-hour speech in 1950, Sen. Joseph McCarthy accused Esther Brunauer of being “instrumental in committing this organization to the support of various [communist] front enterprises.” Brunauer and her husband, like many of their peers at the time, were named as security risks and dismissed from their positions. Read more »

Blog   |   Community   |   2 Comments   |   March 17, 2014
Juliette Gordon Low in uniform awarding the Golden Eaglet to a Girl Scout, 1919.

Beyond Camping and Cookies: AAUW and the Girl Scouts

This week, we celebrate Girl Scout Week. Maybe you were a Girl Scout yourself, or perhaps you have one in your family. Or you may just love those cookies! But […] Read more »

Blog   |   Community   |   March 11, 2014
Delegates vote at AAUW National Convention in Seattle, Washington, 1949. From AAUW Archives.

Opening Membership and Minds

On display at the AAUW national office is a certificate from the National Council of Negro Women, signed by the council’s founder and president, Mary McLeod Bethune. The story behind this certificate is one of the most significant stories in AAUW’s history. Read more »

Blog   |   Community   |   1 Comments   |   February 28, 2014
Black and white girl students in an old classroom

It Didn’t End with Brown v. Board: The Uphill Battle for School Desegregation

After the landmark Brown v. Board civil rights case, many schools struggled with the adjustment to desegregation — and some states even tried to write laws around it. AAUW member Guion Griffis Johnson played a crucial role in desegregating North Carolina’s schools. Read more »

Blog   |   Community   |   February 18, 2014
A black-and-white photograph of Lura Beam

Bringing Art to America

In the 1940s, AAUW’s Lura Beam headed a series of traveling art exhibits that brought Roods, Kollwitzes, Hartleys, and reproductions of Picassos to communities across the country. Read more »

Blog   |   Community   |   February 10, 2014
1966 Dougherty thumbnail

Cleared for Take-Off … Flying Time to Full Recognition, 34 years!

Despite performing critical military functions, WASPs were always considered civilians and, therefore, received no military benefits. When pilot Dora Dougherty went on to continue her education, she did so without the benefits of the G.I. Bill, unlike male veterans. Read more »

Blog   |   Community   |   January 30, 2014
A black and white photo of a reading circle. The children are all sitting with books around their teacher listening to something she's saying.

Education: An Antidote to Poverty

In 1965, AAUW introduced a two-year program studying the potential of education to eradicate poverty. It was our very own War on Poverty, fought entirely by women. Read more »

Blog   |   Community   |   1 Comments   |   January 16, 2014