How a Lockheed Engineer Makes Time to Volunteer with Girls

Tech Trek campers examine a robot at a 2016 New Mexico Tech Trek camp sponsored by Lockheed Martin.

Tech Trek campers examine a robot at a 2016 New Mexico Tech Trek camp sponsored by Lockheed Martin.

September 21, 2016

As an aerospace engineer, Alison Nordt’s job usually has her working on infrared cameras and space telescopes. But for one week every summer, you’ll find her at her alma mater working with rolled-up newspaper and uncooked spaghetti noodles.

Nordt, a graduate of Stanford University with a doctorate in aeronautic engineering, has worked at Lockheed Martin since 1999. She is one of hundreds of women who volunteer each summer at AAUW Tech Trek camps. Held on college campuses across the country, Tech Trek camps reach 1,400 middle school girls annually and encourage girls’ passion for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Lockheed Martin is a national sponsor of Tech Trek and helps support the program’s goal to change the face of STEM by narrowing the gender gap in these fields. The company provides special support to Tech Trek camp locations near local Lockheed Martin facilities, including camps at the University of Alabama, Huntsville; Stockton College in New Jersey; New Mexico Tech University; and two camp sessions at Stanford University.

Aerospace engineer and Lockheed Martin employee Alison Nordt speaks with a group of Tech Trek campers.

Aerospace engineer and Lockheed Martin employee Alison Nordt speaks with a group of Tech Trek campers.

At Tech Trek, Nordt uses the rolled-up newspaper and uncooked spaghetti noodles to facilitate a hands-on workshop that teaches teams of girls the basics of civil engineering. The workshop focuses on understanding structures, but Nordt stresses to the girls that interpersonal skills are also integral to their success. “Working as a team and learning to brainstorm as a team are how you get things done,” she reminds the girls before letting them tackle their projects.

Echoing conclusions from AAUW’s 2015 research report Solving the Equation: The Variables for Women’s Success in Engineering and Computing, Nordt finds mentoring especially important for girls interested in STEM — and, as a mother to a daughter and a son, she also works to expose boys to female STEM role models to demonstrate that women can and do succeed in STEM.

Nordt isn’t new to the more-women-in-STEM mission. She has volunteered at Tech Trek’s Stanford camp since 2012, a commitment made possible in part by Lockheed Martin’s work to encourage greater diversity in STEM. The company demonstrated its commitment to promoting diversity when it chose Marillyn Hewson as its chief executive officer, thereby joining the mere 5 percent of companies in Standard and Poor’s 500 index with female CEOs. Lockheed Martin’s culture of employee volunteerism and flexible work schedules — one of the primary recommendations for employers from AAUW’s 2016 report Barriers and Bias: The Status of Women in Leadership — also make it easy for Nordt to get out of the lab and spend a morning mentoring and teaching.

When she isn’t building bridges and skyscrapers at Tech Trek, Nordt works as the head Lockheed Martin engineer on NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope. The telescope, NASA’s largest science mission ever, will launch in 2018 and is designed to look back in time to discover the origins of the first light in the universe. This complex cryogenic instrument is the result of years of hard work by Nordt and her co-workers at Lockheed Martin’s Advanced Technology Center in Palo Alto, California.

With more dedicated volunteers like Alison, we can hope to see more girls than ever grow up to be aerospace engineers, astronauts, and tech company CEOs.

Is your corporation or foundation interested in getting involved with
Tech Trek? Contact Nicole Phillips for more information.

This post was written by Nicole Phillips, AAUW’s senior manager of corporate development.

 


Related

Tech Savvy in California

How You Can Sponsor AAUW Events and Programs

Find out how you can support programs like AAUW Tech Trek.

Through hands-on experience, students learned how metabolism works to support a living organism.

AAUW Tech Trek

Girls find their passion for high-tech careers at AAUW’s Tech Trek camps.

What Happens at Tech Trek Doesn't Stay at Tech Trek

AAUW’s Corporate Collaborations

We’re proud to collaborate with many companies to empower women and girls across the country.

AAUWguest By:   |   September 21, 2016

1 Comment

  1. Rosette Dawson says:

    Tech Trek is the best STEM program I’ve seen for girls. Getting them involved in Middle School is crucial (in my opinion). The ‘before and after’ for these girls is amazing. We’ve had tremendous local support from Tesoro, Shell, Dakota Creek Industries, Hexcel, Micro Aerodynamics, Synergy Sports Technology and Sturdy Engineering. And I get excited just thinking about these girls eventually returning and being hired as new engineers and technology personnel at these companies! Tech Trek has been in Washington State since 2013. I wish every girl would have the opportunity to attend – just takes funding! … Okay, and all the wonderful volunteers we have to make the program happen. Even if the girls don’t end up in STEM careers, they will be better and more thoughtful world citizens.
    A big thanks to Lockheed-Martin and to their women engineers. I’m impressed!

Join the Conversation

You must be logged in to post a comment.