5 Ways to Support a Future STEM Rockstar with AAUW and FabLab

Jordan Mader, left and Meredith Coil build a gumdrop bridge during the Tech Savvy workshop, at Ohio University May 17, 2014. The event exposes girls from sixth through ninth grade to the field of science, technology, engineering and math. Photo by Ohio University / Jonathan Adams

Jordan Mader, left and Meredith Coil build a gumdrop bridge during the Tech Savvy workshop, at Ohio University May 17, 2014. The event exposes girls from sixth through ninth grade to the field of science, technology, engineering and math. Photo by Ohio University / Jonathan Adams

May 24, 2016

 

Know a future STEM star who just needs a little encouragement, but don’t know where to start? AAUW and FabLab have you covered. Here are five ways to support a girl’s passion for science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM).

 

1. Watch FabLab, the STEM lover’s favorite new show.

Each week, FabLab showcases fun science experiments and explores new stories of innovators in science and technology who are improving the world around them. That’s why AAUW is proud to collaborate with FabLab on their awesome new series.

See FabLab for yourself: Check your local listings to tune in, or set your DVR.

 

2. Bring math and science home with these experiments.

Image via Pinterest

Looking for more ways to explore STEM fields at home? We have some ideas: Make “magic pepper,” “jumbo bubbles,” “elephant toothpaste,” and more fun concoctions with simple ingredients from your kitchen.

Check out these at-home science experiments from our friends at Green Works.

 

3. Take it to the next level with AAUW’s STEM education programs.

Ready for a taste of what it’s like to be a FabLab inventor for yourself? At AAUW, we’re supporting tomorrow’s “STEMinists” through our STEM education programs for middle school girls, AAUW Tech Trek and AAUW Tech Savvy. These AAUW member- and volunteer-led programs engage girls with hands-on science experiments, introduce girls to role models, and teach parents how to encourage their daughters!

What are you waiting for? Find an AAUW Tech Trek camp or AAUW Tech Savvy conference near you!

 

4. Do your research — with AAUW research!

Solving the Equation

We support innovative STEM education opportunities because our research shows that middle school is a critical time to engage girls in these fields. By high school and college, the number of women in STEM fields drops, and the gender gap only widens in the STEM workforce.

But our research doesn’t just diagnose the problem: We also know how to solve it. We have plenty of great tips and advice, from creating welcoming classroom environments to cultivating a growth mindset to choosing courses.

Download our Solving the Equation report, and read our recommendations for educators (page 105), parents (page 108), and girls (page 109).

 

5. Follow us on social media.

Social Media

Image by Christiaan Colen, Flickr Creative Commons

Don’t miss the latest updates from FabLab and AAUW!

Follow AAUW on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, and Tumblr.

Follow FabLab on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and YouTube.

Know someone else who’s ready to experiment with math and science, who’s concerned about the STEM gender gap, or who wants to inspire a girl in their life? Share these resources with friends, family, and your network. The girls we support today are the innovators of tomorrow.


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Ryan Burwinkel By:   |   May 24, 2016

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