By the Numbers: A Look at the Gender Pay Gap

September 18, 2014

 

Update September 17, 2015: The latest data from the U.S. Census Bureau shows minuscule changes to the overall gender pay gap and the pay gap for women of color. Take a look at The Simple Truth about the Gender Pay Gap report for the most current information.

Imagine you work an entry-level job alongside someone who has less experience than you but still makes more money. Maybe you become a supervisor, yet still take home less pay than the employees you manage. Years go by and you look back on a lifetime of work and realize you lost hundreds of thousands of dollars in earnings.

This is real life for women working in a country with a gender pay gap alive and well. The latest data from the U.S. Census Bureau illustrate how that gap affects women, who are the primary source of income for 40 percent of American families.

The Big Number

First, there’s the benchmark. In 2013, the typical woman working full time, year round in the United States earned 78 percent of men’s earnings. That number rose a lousy 1 percent since 2012 — a change that is not significantly different.
Fig1
This is the point in the story when critics like to stomp all over the 78-cent statistic. Much of what they say is fair: This number doesn’t take into consideration factors like industry, education, and experience. But this number is important because it offers a snapshot of where women stand in making money for their families. And the big pay gap number makes clear that, for whatever reason, women are making less money than men. Period.

Of course AAUW is also interested in the reasons behind the pay gap. That’s why in 2012 we published a report that made an apples-to-apples comparison. We looked at workers one year out of college, when men and women are virtually equal in age, education, and family responsibilities, and we controlled for factors known to affect earnings, such as major, occupation, and hours worked.

Guess what. We still found an unexplainable 7 percent gender pay gap. We know that this gap gets worse with age, affecting both women’s take-home pay and their retirement accounts. (AAUW welcomes people to donate 7 percent of their paycheck to us if they think that’s a small number not worth quibbling over.)

The Race Effect

Race and ethnicity have always created a dividing line in the United States, and it’s no different with the gender pay gap. When a race lens is added to the pay gap, it becomes clear that the pay gap is worse for many women of color. Here’s a look at what women of different races and ethnicities make compared with non-Hispanic white men (a benchmark used because they make up the largest demographic group in the labor force).

  • Asian American women experience the smallest gender pay gap: In 2013 they took home 90 percent of white men’s earnings (a 3 percent increase from 2012).
  • The gap is largest for Hispanic and Latina women, who were paid only 54 percent of what white men were paid in 2013 (a 1 percent increase from 2012).
  • The gender pay gap for American Indian and Alaska Native women has widened just slightly since 2012, dropping from 60 to 59 percent in 2013. Similarly, compared with 2012, the gender pay gap for Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander women widened by 1 percent to 65 percent.
  • The gender pay gap held steady for African American women, who were paid 64 percent of what white men were paid in 2013, and for white women, who were paid 78 percent of what white men were paid.

Fig4
Similar to the 78-percent benchmark, some of these statistics can be explained, to a point, by varying factors. For example, African American women are less likely to graduate from high school or college than their white peers. Lower graduation rates mean that many African American and Hispanic/Latina women enter the workforce with the figurative one hand tied behind their backs.

Still, while education improves take-home pay for everyone, many women of color tend to be paid less than their white peers even when they have the same educational background. This tells us that educational background isn’t the whole story. A possible explanation is discrimination, whether overt or implicit. Both forms of bias can affect take-home pay.

Location, Location, Location: The Pay Gap by State

The old real estate adage also applies to the gender pay gapwhere you live has everything to do with the pay gap in your community.

2013 was a big year for Wyoming, which shed its ranking as the state with the worst pay gap. Louisiana, which in 2012 sat just one spot away from worst, has taken its place. Washington, D.C., meanwhile, maintained its supreme rank as the least-bad place for women’s pay. Maryland, however, lost its spot to New York for the state with the smallest pay gap in 2013.

Why does the gap vary so much from state to state? There is no single answer to this question, but there are factors that, taken together, can explain at least some of pay gap.

First, the kinds of industries in a state form part of the answer. As men and women still tend to work in different industries and in different jobs, their opportunities and earnings vary by state.

The sector of the economy can also make a difference. If a state has a large percentage of jobs in the public sector, for example, the pay gap is often narrower.

The age and race/ethnicity of a state’s population play a role as well. The gender pay gap within a single group is widest between white women and white men, while the earnings of black and Hispanic women are closer to those of their male counterparts.


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The Simple Truth about the Gender Pay Gap

Research explains the pay gap in the United States: how it affects women of all ages, races, and education levels and what you can do to close it.

By:   |   September 18, 2014

127 Comments

  1. […] the wage gap varies significantly by race, according to an analysis from the research organization AAUW. While white women experienced that […]

  2. […] the wage gap varies significantly by race, according to an analysis from the research organization AAUW. While white women experienced that […]

  3. […] since originally published:  Look at AAUW’s detailed breakdown of the current wage gap figures, including an analysis of race and geography […]

  4. […] analysis by AAUW shows that while the gap narrowed overall last year–by that statistically insignificant […]

  5. […] analysis by AAUW shows that while the gap narrowed overall last year–by that statistically insignificant […]

  6. […] By the Numbers: A Look at the Gender Pay Gap by the American Association of University Women (AAUW) […]

  7. […] Imagine you work an entry-level job alongside someone who has less experience than you but still makes more money. Maybe you become a supervisor, yet still take home less pay than the employees you manage. Years go by and you look back on a lifetime of work and realize you lost hundreds of thousands of dollars in earnings. This is real life for women working in a country with a gender pay gap alive and well. The latest data from the U.S. Census Bureau illustrate how that gap affects women, who are the primary source of income for 40 percent of American families. The Big Number First, there’s the benchmark. In 2013, the typical woman working full time, year-round in the United States earned 78 percent of men’s earnings. That number rose a lousy 1 percent since 2012 — a change that is not significantly different. This is the point in the story when critics like to stomp all over the 78-cent statistic. Much of what they say is fair: This number doesn’t take into consideration factors like industry, education, and experience. But this number is important because it offers a snapshot of where women stand in making money for their families. And the big pay gap number makes clear that, for whatever reason, women are making less money than men. Period. Of course AAUW is also interested in the reasons behind the pay gap. That’s why in 2012 we published a report that made an apples-to-apples comparison. We looked at workers one year out of college, when men and women are virtually equal in age, education, and family responsibilities, and we controlled for factors known to affect earnings, such as major, occupation, and hours worked. Guess what. We still found an unexplainable 7 percent gender pay gap. We know that this gap gets worse with age, affecting both women’s take-home pay and their retirement accounts. (AAUW welcomes people to donate 7 percent of their paycheck to us if they think that’s a small number not worth quibbling over.) The Race Effect Race and ethnicity have always created a dividing line in the United States, and it’s no different with the gender pay gap. When a race lens is added to the pay gap, it becomes clear that the pay gap is worse for many women of color. Here’s a look at what women of different races and ethnicities make compared with non-Hispanic white men (a benchmark used because they make up the largest demographic group in the labor force). Asian American women experience the smallest gender pay gap: In 2013 they took home 90 percent of white men’s earnings (a 3 percent increase from 2012). The gap is largest for Hispanic and Latina women, who were paid only 54 percent of what white men were paid in 2013 (a 1 percent increase from 2012). The gender pay gap for American Indian and Alaska Native women has widened just slightly since 2012, dropping from 60 to 59 percent in 2013. Similarly, compared with 2012, the gender pay gap for Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander women widened by 1 percent to 65 percent. The gender pay gap held steady for African American women, who were paid 64 percent of what white men were paid in 2013, and for white women, who were paid 78 percent of what white men were paid. Similar to the 78-percent benchmark, some of these statistics can be explained, to a point, by varying factors. For example, African American women are less likely to graduate from high school or college than their white peers. Lower graduation rates mean that many African American and Hispanic/Latina women enter the workforce with the figurative one hand tied behind their backs. Still, while education improves take-home pay for everyone, many women of color tend to be paid less than their white peers even when they have the same educational background. This tells us that educational background isn’t the whole story. A possible explanation is discrimination, whether overt or implicit. Both forms of bias can affect take-home pay. Location, Location, Location: The Pay Gap by State The old real estate adage also applies to the gender pay gap — where you live has everything to do with the pay gap in your community. 2013 was a big year for Wyoming, which shed its ranking as the state with the worst pay gap. Louisiana, which in 2012 sat just one spot away from worst, has taken its place. Washington, D.C., meanwhile, maintained its supreme rank as the least-bad place for women’s pay. Maryland, however, lost its spot to New York for the state with the smallest pay gap in 2013. Why does the gap vary so much from state to state? There is no single answer to this question, but there are factors that, taken together, can explain at least some of pay gap. First, the kinds of industries in a state form part of the answer. As men and women still tend to work in different industries and in different jobs, their opportunities and earnings vary by state. The sector of the economy can also make a difference. If a state has a large percentage of jobs in the public sector, for example, the pay gap is often narrower. The age and race/ethnicity of a state’s population play a role as well. The gender pay gap within a single group is widest between white women and white men, while the earnings of black and Hispanic women are closer to those of their male counterparts. This piece was cross-posted here with permission from AAUW. […]

  8. […] and Latina Women are subject to the widest gender wage gap according to a study by The American Association of University Women, having been paid 54 percent of what white men were paid in 2013. The smallest wage gap was found […]

  9. […] and Latina Women are subject to the widest gender wage gap according to a study by The American Association of University Women, having been paid 54 percent of what white men were paid in 2013. The smallest wage gap was found […]

  10. […] pay gap affects women of all backgrounds, but unsurprisingly, race and ethnicity matter when it comes to women’s paychecks. Hispanic and Latina women face the worst disparity, getting […]

  11. […] in the workplace. Many are aware of the commonly quoted statistic that women averagely make 78 cents for every man’s dollar, but those numbers are only true when comparing white women to white men. […]

  12. […] of color have been putting in even more time. Black women have been working for free since August 21. Hispanic women have been doing so since […]

  13. […] Sex work as selling a fantastical performance of self also ties to Masser’s explorations of hypersexualized fantasies created about the black body. In the case of black men these stereotypes are historically tied to rape fantasies and cuckolding as a fetish, and for black women constant sexual interest/availability. Sex work also ties into the labor of black bodies, and the way it has been systematically devalued. Despite the fetishization of blackness by white consumers, black sex workers are still paid less just as in other fields. […]

  14. […] accordance with Census statistics launched in September, 2014. And the pay hole is even worse for ladies of shade (fifty four % for Hispanic ladies and sixty four % for African-American […]

  15. […] 2013, according to Census statistics released in September, 2014. And the pay gap is even worse for women of color (54 percent for Hispanic women and 64 percent for African-American […]

  16. […] The five primary reasons for the wage gap can all be seen in how household chores are distributed: 1) persistent sex segregation of the workforce; 2) the devaluation of women’s work and overvaluation of men’s work; 3) implicit bias and stereotype threat that remain largely unexamined; 4) a systemic failure to recognize the economic value of women’s provision of care work and 5) good, old-fashioned discrimination. People making “no-wage-gap-motherhood-the-most-important-job-in-the-world” arguments aren’t interested in the root causes of sex-segregated work, or why men’s work is always higher paying. (Men earn more than women in 527 of the 534 jobs tracked by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.) Nor have I ever seen serious responses to studies that routinely show that women are, in fact, offered less money to do the same work, or work categorized as similar. (Among 135 countries, the US ranks 67th for “wage equality for similar work” between men and women.) And while race is clearly substantively consequential, within each racial category gender gaps exist. […]

  17. […] The five primary reasons for the wage gap can all be seen in how household chores are distributed: 1) persistent sex segregation of the workforce; 2) the devaluation of women’s work and overvaluation of men’s work; 3) implicit bias and stereotype threat that remain largely unexamined; 4) a systemic failure to recognize the economic value of women’s provision of care work and 5) good, old-fashioned discrimination. People making “no-wage-gap-motherhood-the-most-important-job-in-the-world” arguments aren’t interested in the root causes of sex-segregated work, or why men’s work is always higher paying. (Men earn more than women in 527 of the 534 jobs tracked by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.) Nor have I ever seen serious responses to studies that routinely show that women are, in fact, offered less money to do the same work, or work categorized as similar. (Among 135 countries, the US ranks 67th for “wage equality for similar work” between men and women.) And while race is clearly substantively consequential, within each racial category gender gaps exist. […]

  18. […] has the largest gender pay gap in the country, with women making 66 cents to a man’s dollar. African-American women make just 49 […]

  19. […] problem. (The folks who made this video are from Australia.) In the U.S., women experience it in all states. Washington, D.C., is at the top of the pay equity scale (paying women 91% of what men earn) and […]

  20. […] problem. (The folks who made this video are from Australia.) In the U.S., women experience it in all states . Washington, D.C., is at the top of the pay equity scale (paying women 91% of what men earn) and […]

  21. […] U.S. doesn’t officially track the pay gap through a government agency like other nations, including the Aussies who made the video below, but […]

  22. […] The five primary reasons for the wage gap can all be seen in how household chores are distributed: 1) persistent sex segregation of the workforce; 2) the devaluation of women’s work and overvaluation of men’s work; 3) implicit bias and stereotype threat that remain largely unexamined; 4) a systemic failure to recognize the economic value of women’s provision of care work and 5) good, old-fashioned discrimination. People making “no-wage-gap-motherhood-the-most-important-job-in-the-world” arguments aren’t interested in the root causes of sex-segregated work, or why men’s work is always higher paying. (Men earn more than women in 527 of the 534 jobs tracked by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.) Nor have I ever seen serious responses to studies that routinely show that women are, in fact, offered less money to do the same work, or work categorized as similar. (Among 135 countries, the US ranks 67th for “wage equality for similar work” between men and women.) And while race is clearly substantively consequential, within each racial category gender gaps exist. […]

  23. […] in every state experience the pay gap, but some states are worse than others. The best place in the United […]

  24. […] feminist posts about wanting equal wages to white men; she ignores the woman of colour. In 2013, white women in the US earned at least 24% more than Hispanic women, and at least 14% more than Afric… (1). In my opinion, before we focus on bridging the gap between male and female pay, we should […]

  25. […] gender pay gap and the need for wage equality. Women earn 78% less than men for the same job. But women of color earn far less. Black women earn 64% less, Indigenous women earn 59% less and Latina women earn 54% less than […]

  26. […] the high points of the ceremony last night is to continue to talk about what was brought up: the wage gap, foregrounding race in the discussion; the prison-industrial complex; the need for immigration reform; and the dangerous erosion of the […]

  27. […] I imagine that I will be attacked because I am a white feminist defending another white feminist. But before you decide I am the devil, please look at my record. I believe all people, no matter who they are, deserve equality. I am not suggesting in ANY WAY that any one group is more deserving than another. The ERA is one leg of equal rights that will help the overall economy and help women and men who face gender discrimination. Especially those who are discriminated against the most – poor women of color. […]

  28. […] wage gap varies significantly by race — while the oft-cited figure that women make about 77 cents to every man’s dollar […]

  29. […] There is a huge disparity in earned wages. It is a shame that on average, women earn approximately 20% less then their male counterparts. And that is something that should be addressed. However, you cannot address the wage gap issue without addressing race. Why? Well, take a look at the table I created based on data from The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics and The American Association of University Women.  […]

  30. […] A white man makes $1.28 for every dollar that a White woman makes. […]

  31. […] wage inequality, race is as much a factor as gender. The American Association of University Women analyzed census data on the wage gap and found that although white women make 78 cents to a white man's dollar in the United States, […]

  32. […] pay gap is worse for women of color – Hispanic women show the largest disparity, with 54 percent of white male earnings (the […]

  33. […] the Equal Pay Act in 1963. (With no mention of Kennedy’s further speech upon signing or modern day realities of the very real pay gap, I don’t have the time to unpack how off-base this statement […]

  34. […] wage gap between men and women is compounded by race and sexual orientation. In the US, while white women make 78 cents for each dollar earned by a white man, black women make o… Same sex couples with children earn 20% less than comparable straight couples, and transgender […]

  35. […] surely depends on it…” In America, on average, the American Association of University Women reports that in 2013, white women made 78 percent of what their white male counterparts earned. African […]

  36. […] I found this excellent picture on the American Association of University Women website. […]

  37. […] communities the hardest. African American men earn $0.75 to the dollar as compared to white men (it’s even worse for women) and are far more likely to be given subprime mortgages. If you account for assets, white families […]

  38. […] gender inequality in the work force not only exists in the United States, but it exist in every single state. The difference in pay for women is mostly based on race, which has no logical justification. The […]

  39. […] By the Numbers: A Look at the Gender Pay Gap (aauw.org, 2014) […]

  40. […] a role in the gender pay gap in America, where Asian American, Hispanic and African American women receive lower wages than white […]

  41. […] The pay gap is worse for women of color. […]

  42. […] is the wage gap evident in contemporary society. Mainstream feminists address the fact that women make 78 cents to every dollar of their mail counterpart — but they fail to address how black women […]

  43. […] 77 cents has become synonymous with the modern feminist struggle. But the fact that this figure represents white female wages to those of white men is usually left out of the conversation. Black women make […]

  44. […] As we celebrated International Women’s Day last Sunday, we were given a grave reminder of just how far the world has to go to achieve gender equality. International Women’s Day tends to do that. Stories celebrating amazing women like Shirley Chisholm are often paired with not-so-amazing stats on gender equality. Stats like 1 in 3 women face violence globally, women make up just 22 percent of parliamentarians worldwide and African American women only make 64 percent of the white male dollar. […]

  45. […] to some of the most recent data available, the average woman who works full time earns only 78% of what men earn. Although there are many […]

  46. […] Not being white. The wage gap widens when you factor in race, according to 2013 stats from the U.S. Census Bureau. While white women were paid 78 percent of […]

  47. […] Not being white. The wage gap widens when you factor in race, according to 2013 stats from the U.S. Census Bureau. While white women were paid 78 percent of […]

  48. […] Not being white. The wage gap widens when you factor in race, according to 2013 stats from the U.S. Census Bureau. While white women were paid 78 percent of […]

  49. […] Not being white. The wage gap widens when you factor in race, according to 2013 stats from the U.S. Census Bureau. While white women were paid 78 percent of […]

  50. […] to some of the most recent data available, the average woman who works full time earns only 78% of what men earn. Although there are many […]

  51. […] would skew the results. Another factor is race: On average, Hispanic and black women experience a wider pay gap than their white […]

  52. […] In STEM, as in the wider world, “misogynasian” persists as a method to reinforce Occidental and male control, thereby prohibiting the Asian American woman from ever being seen as an intellectual peer. Misogynasian has quantifiable consequences: in STEM, Asian American women face institutional barriers by virtue of both race and gender — a “bamboo glass ceiling” — that delay upward mobility and cause large numbers of Asian American women to exit the workforce. Those that remain endure one of the largest pay gaps of any woman of colour: Asian American women are paid a mere 79 cents to the dollar paid to an Asian American man. […]

  53. […] causes large numbers of Asian American women to exit the workforce. Those who remain are paid 79 cents to the dollar paid to an Asian American man (the largest gender pay gap within an ethnicity, albeit the […]

  54. […] Original video by Paul Gale Comedy. While this video isn’t sponsored, Paul gave a shoutout to the National Organization for Women, which I think is pretty cool. So I figured I’d shout them out too. Original Upworthy graphic features a Thinkstock image, and the stats are via The American Association of University Women. […]

  55. […] to the study from AAUW, wage inequality is present in every state; that inequality is more prominent with the women of color; it happens in all occupations no mater […]

  56. […] paid. And many women of color are hit even harder by the wage gap, with Latina women earning just 54 percent of every dollar a white man males, and black women earning 64 […]

  57. […] paid. And many women of color are hit even harder by the wage gap, with Latina women earning just 54 percent of every dollar a white man males, and black women earning 64 […]

  58. […] paid. And many women of color are hit even harder by the wage gap, with Latina women earning just 54 percent of every dollar a white man males, and black women earning 64 […]

  59. […] paid. And many women of color are hit even harder by the wage gap, with Latina women earning just 54 percent of every dollar a white man males, and black women earning 64 […]

  60. […] paid. And many women of color are hit even harder by the wage gap, with Latina women earning just 54 percent of every dollar a white man males, and black women earning 64 […]

  61. […] paid. And many women of color are hit even harder by the wage gap, with Latina women earning just 54 percent of every dollar a white man males, and black women earning 64 […]

  62. […] paid. And many women of color are hit even harder by the wage gap, with Latina women earning just 54 percent of every dollar a white man males, and black women earning 64 […]

  63. […] Empowering Women Since 1881 By the Numbers A Look at the Gender Pay Gap Comments.  September 18, 2014. Accessed April 3, 2015. http://www.aauw.org/2014/09/18/gender-pay-gap/. […]

  64. […] paid. And many women of color are hit even harder by the wage gap, with Latina women earning just 54 percent of every dollar a white man males, and black women earning 64 […]

  65. […] will tell you the pay gap is a myth. Those people are nuts. The Census Bureau has consistently acknowledged the existence of a pay gap, so if you meet a naysayer, tell them to take a hike and read some […]

  66. […] But I’m actually pretty lucky — I’m young, white, not starting a family. Black women earn 68 cents compared to white men’s dollar. Hispanic women earn only 54 cents. […]

  67. […] gender pay gap isn’t dying out anytime soon (not for about 85 years to be exact). On average, working women earn about 78 percent as men, a… […]

  68. […] gender pay gap isn’t dying out anytime soon (not for about 85 years to be exact). On average, working women earn about 78 percent as men, according to the White House. April 14 is Equal Pay Day, which represents the extra months women […]

  69. […] gender pay gap isn’t dying out anytime soon (not for about 85 years to be exact). On average, working women earn about 78 percent as men, according to the White House. April 14 is Equal Pay Day, which represents the extra months women […]

  70. […] gender pay gap isn’t dying out anytime soon (not for about 85 years to be exact). On average, working women earn about 78 percent as men, according to the White House. April 14 is Equal Pay Day, which represents the extra months women […]

  71. […] gender pay gap isn’t dying out anytime soon (not for about 85 years to be exact). On average, working women earn about 78 percent as men, according to the White House. April 14 is Equal Pay Day, which represents the extra months women […]

  72. […] that were actually found incorrect with research where aauw.org reported that the gap for Latina women was actually found to be, most recently, 54%; though still […]

  73. […] gender pay gap isn’t dying out anytime soon (not for about 85 years to be exact ). On average, working women earn about 78 percent as men , according to the White House. April 14 is Equal Pay Day, which represents the extra months women […]

  74. […] gender pay gap isn’t dying out anytime soon (not for about 85 years to be exact). On average, working women earn about 78 percent as men, a… […]

  75. […] gender pay gap isn’t dying out anytime soon (not for about 85 years to be exact). On average, working women earn about 78 percent as men, a… […]

  76. […] gender pay gap isn’t dying out anytime soon (not for about 85 years to be exact). On average, working women earn about 78 percent as men, a… […]

  77. […] gender pay gap isn’t dying out anytime soon (not for about 85 years to be exact). On average, working women earn about 78 percent as men, according to the White House. April 14 is Equal Pay Day, which represents the extra months women […]

  78. […] gender pay gap isn’t dying out anytime soon (not for about 85 years to be exact). On average, working women earn about 78 percent as men, according to the White House. April 14 is Equal Pay Day, which represents the extra months women […]

  79. […] Hispanic women earn 54%, followed by black women at 64%, and Native American at 65%. (The wage gap closes somewhat for women of color vs. men of the same race or […]

  80. […] Hispanic women earn 54%, followed by black women at 64%, and Native American at 65%. (The wage gap closes somewhat for women of color vs. men of the same race or […]

  81. […] Hispanic women earn 54%, followed by black women at 64%, and Native American at 65%. (The wage gap closes somewhat for women of color vs. men of the same race or […]

  82. […] gender pay gap isn’t dying out anytime soon (not for about 85 years to be exact). On average, working women earn about 78 percent as men, according to the White House. April 14 is Equal Pay Day, which represents the extra months women […]

  83. […] and legislation to extend the same pay entitlements to men and women.” I’ve cited these glaring statistics so many times, but they are so relevant: women, on the whole, earn just 78 cents on the dollar to […]

  84. […] and legislation to extend the same pay entitlements to men and women.” I’ve cited these glaring statistics so many times, but they are so relevant: women, on the whole, earn just 78 cents on the dollar to […]

  85. […] about the wage gap between male and female workers is the role of race. Though white women earn a mere 78% of what their male counterparts earn in America, the gap is far greater for women of color. African […]

  86. […] Even if not everyone wants to treat women equally, it is pretty hard to deny that women are necessary to keep the world going- they are afterall our life givers. Science is even making advances that could render men completely useless by discovering that children can be conceived using bone marrow from another woman. Of course men won’t stand for there to be a world that could function without them, so they have to create ways to keep women down while they can. One huge factor of patriarchy that holds women down is the gender pay gap. The US, a country that likes to brag about their freedom and elite development, ranks only 65th out of a 142 developed countries in wage equality according to a recent CNN Money report. As of 2014, women were only making 66% of what a man would make doing the same job (CNN). The gap differs for women of color as well, according to this American Association of University Women (AAUW) article: […]

  87. […] and Alaska Native 59% and Latinas are the least paid at 54% in comparison to what White men earn. AAUW took many things into consideration including education and experience as to why women of color are […]

  88. […] 23 cents more, but that’s more folks. Contrary to what the other commentors on the page said, lots of studies have been conducted controlling for factors like equal work, experience, education, etc. And the […]

  89. […] wage gap between men and women is compounded by race and sexual orientation. In the US, while white women make 78 cents for each dollar earned by a white man, black women make o… Same sex couples with children earn 20% less than comparable straight couples, and transgender […]

  90. […] wage gap exacerbates the problem. Women as a whole earn $0.78 for every dollar men earn and for women of color the statistics are far worse, with Latina women making barely half a dollar for every dollar men […]

  91. […] push for legislation that guarantees pay equality for America’s women. Latinas are paid just 54 cents on the dollar compared to non-Hispanic White workers. Latinos want to hear how these candidates plan to change […]

  92. […] push for legislation that guarantees pay equality for America’s women. Latinas are paid just 54 cents on the dollar compared to non-Hispanic White workers. Latinos want to hear how these candidates plan to change […]

  93. […] According to a fall 2014 poll by Pew Research center, 77 percent of women and 63 percent of men agree that “this country needs to continue making changes to give men and women equality in the workplace.” Although women hold 49.3 percent of jobs, they only earn 78 cents for every dollar a man earns. It’s even less for women of color – Hispanic women earn 54 cents for every dollar white men earn, and African-American women earn 64 cents for every dollar … […]

  94. […] remain: Given the current state of the gender wage gap, will this lady-faced $10 bill be worth a mere $7.80? Or would it be worth even less if the face of the bill is a woman of color? (Scroll down in that […]

  95. […] Gov. Jindal took office in 2008, Louisiana has earned some dubious honors. The state has the largest gender pay gap in the country, with women making 66 cents for every dollar a man […]

  96. […] when white women speak about issues such as street harassment, hate crimes, sexual assault, and the wage gap without even so much as mentioning how these issues specifically impact people of color, […]

  97. […] it’s important to note that the popular 77 cents to the dollar stat is only for white women. Hispanic woman make 54 cents to the white man’s dollar, the highest gap in this country. So it’s very important to notice that the wage gap is an inter-sectional issue, and we need […]

  98. […] The pay gap is worse for women of color. […]

  99. […] to equality: ignorance. How many of your elders and friends realise that Latina women have the largest wage gap, earning only 54 cents for every dollar that white men earn? How many know that 41% of transgender […]

  100. […] average African-American woman earns 91 percent of an African-American man’s salary and at the same time 64 percent of a white […]

  101. […] wealth for every $41, 500 that white women have. So even though Latina women and black women earn between 54 percent and 64 percent, respectively, on every dollar a white man makes, somehow we manage to save even less of that money […]

  102. […] than any other minority group. Even compared to white women, black women were reportedly paid 78% less than white women and 91% than white men in 2014. However, according to reports in that same […]

  103. […] In 2013, white women were paid 78% of what white men were paid, whilst African-American women earned 64% and Hispanic and Latina women only 54%. Picking apart these statistics requires a focus on class and race issues as well as gender politics, in addition to the relationship between these categories […]

  104. […] man is being used as the ‘measuring stick’ for comparison is because white men make up the largest demographic group in the American labour force. It is interesting to see which ethnicities are associated with the higher and lower earnings for […]

  105. […] to people about money. Talk to people about money. The only way we will ever be able to close the pay gaps (yes, plural) is to get very transparent with each other about how work is […]

  106. […] know women across all races, on average, make less than white men, women of color make the least. According to the American Association of University Women, black women earned 64% of a white man’s […]

  107. […] treatment between white women and women of color continues to this day. For example, the wage gap varies significantly by race, according to an analysis from the research organization AAUW.  A 2014 article by ThinkProgress […]

  108. […] Women also continue to make 78 cents to the dollar compared to men, a gap that has remained largely unchanged for more than a decade. The problem is even worse for women of color. […]

  109. […] Women also continue to make 78 cents to the dollar compared to men, a gap that has remained largely unchanged for more than a decade. The problem is even worse for women of color. […]

  110. […] even when we do get jobs we are paid less. According to AAUW, Black women earn 64 percent of what white men earn and Latinas 54 percent compared to 78 percent […]

  111. […] and queer women, and the myriad intersections in between—when you’re upset about 78 cents (but haven’t considered 64 cents—or 54 cents), or street harassment (without considering disparities), or reproductive health care rights […]

  112. […] about the wage gap between male and female workers is the role of race. Though white women earn a mere 78% of what their male counterparts earn in America, the gap is far greater for women of color. African […]

  113. […] discrimination isn’t simply black and white. Race also affects the gender pay gap in a big […]

  114. […] women in this country being paid 78 cents to a man’s dollar, Black women 64 cents and Latina women 54 cents, and pay inequity […]

  115. […] stating that women in the U.S. make 77 cents to the man’s dollar. However, when broken down by race as well as gender, the wage gap tells a completely different story. In comparison to the white […]

  116. […] women have yet to become truly equal. In their careers, they earn less than men doing equal work; on the streets, they are catcalled and made to feel dirty regardless of their […]

  117. […] heard the statistic that women make 78 cents to the dollar, right? Unfortunately, this figure doesn’t tell the whole story. If we look at Black women specifically, they’re paid 64 cents to the dollar (specifically, the […]

  118. […] There are certainly women who are more privileged than other women. White women, for example, as earlier cited, earn 77 cents on the comparative dollar, while Latina women only earn 54 cents. […]

  119. […] a woman, I am likely to be paid less than a man, but I still am likely to get paid more than most women of color. As a disabled person, it is […]

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