The American Dream

May 28, 2010

Last week, five cap-and-gown clad students — three of whom were illegal immigrants — risked arrest and deportation to hold a sit-in in Sen. John McCain’s (R-AZ) Tucson office. Earlier in the month, four high-ranking college students from Florida — only one of whom has been able to obtain legal residency — completed their four-month, 1,500-mile trek from Miami to Washington, their self-proclaimed “Trail of Dreams.”

What is the dream these students are after? What is important enough to make them risk arrest and deportation from the only country most of them know? It’s not fame or fortune they seek, but simply the opportunity to pursue a higher education. Their actions were meant to raise awareness and push for passage of the Dream Act (H.R. 1751/S. 729), legislation that would allow undocumented students who were raised in the United States and have graduated from American high schools the chance to go to college, contribute to the nation’s economy, and start on their path to citizenship.

Under current law, undocumented immigrants wishing to attend college are unable to access state financial aid in most states, are ineligible for federal student loans, and are unable to legally work to pay for tuition and the other costs associated with college. It goes without saying that without the funds to pay for higher education, their hands are tied.

Under the Dream Act, undocumented students who entered the United States before they were 16 and have lived here for at least five years could gain permanent legal status and eventually citizenship if they attend college or join the military for at least two years and display good moral character. States would be allowed to offer these students in-state tuition, and the students could receive federal loans upon adjustment of their legal status. The legislation would provide a path to citizenship for an estimated 65,000 immigrants annually who were brought to this country as young children and essentially know no other home.

The Dream Act benefits not only these students, but our nation as well. On average, a worker’s earnings double with a college degree compared to a high school degree. Increased education and earnings lead to increased tax revenue, decreased reliance on public assistance programs, lower unemployment rates, and increased voting, volunteering, and other civic activities. A well-educated society is a stronger society.

Without the Dream Act, hard-working students who consider the United States their home and had no say in the decision to come here in the first place will continue to be punished, and the cycle of poverty will continue to be propagated by condemning these students to low-wage jobs. Is this the American dream we idealize and on which our country was founded? I think not.

By:   |   May 28, 2010

73 Comments

  1. John Bradley says:

    Greetings,
    Let’s DREAM big…support this legislation to mitigate the immigration issue!

    John

  2. GLEN MOWREY says:

    America needs an educated public to compete in the world community.

  3. Legal Citizen says:

    Unbelievable. “Legal” immigrants wait in countries all over the world to enter the US and then do it within the boundries of our law. To allow illegals to benefit from breaking our immigration laws is not how our immigration policy was designed. Upon receiving free educational opportunities, their relatives are also allowed free passage into US citizenship.
    This is so wrong. We are a nation of laws, not of men. Does the AAUW not believe in our laws? They must not if they support this “Nightmare”. This progressive thinking undermines our very constitution.

  4. Marilyn Taylor says:

    The Dream Act is essential for young people who are on the way to being good citizens if the they are given this opportunity. If we have a concern for human rghts and education, this bill must be passed.

  5. marvin seymour says:

    I agree with all you are doing for the education of aliens that have lived in the US all their life. I believe there are a lot more important things going on in our country at this time.

  6. Lucy Fields says:

    Just what is it about AAUW that does not understand the word illegal? Why do we, as educated women, continue to support this concept? I do not oppose immigration. I do oppose breaking the law! If one wishes to enter the United States of America, follow the law. We are spending way too much money on illegals!!!! Why does AAUW continue to support breaking the law? I have been a member of AAUW for over 30 years. I have often thought about dropping my membership because of these very liberal ideas which are supported. I support the ideals of equity for women and continue to pay my dues. Sometimes I really think I may be wrong!

  7. Mary lea Adkins says:

    Please refer to Department of Defense naturalization of aliens, January 2006. All Aliens who serve in the Armed Services, their spouses and children can become naturalized citizens if they serve honorably in the US Armed services. As members of the armed services, they can contribute to their own education fund and become citizens of the US. I am in favor of continuing this policy and adding to it that if they do not qualify for the US Armed Services such as being handicapped, then exceptions could be made but this would be a strong minority.

  8. helgahans@aol.com says:

    sorry…I TOTALLY DISAGREE WITH THE DREAM ACT!

    if your parents were illegal, you are illegal. that is the law.

    only legal immigrants should be allowed to enjoy the rights of legal immigrants.

    i am a LEGAL immigrant…so it is not difficult to understand my position.

  9. Wave Starnes says:

    The Dream act will make it possible for kids who ar basically American–speak English, have been educated in this country, are excelling–to attend college and be full fledged citizens. We should do this!

  10. marj freda says:

    The Dream Act must and should be passed. It’s what my immigrant parents hoped for and got. This generation should be granted the same despite that their families came into this country illegally.

  11. joyce says:

    NO WAY SHOULD WE DO THIS FOR ILLEGAL (NOT UNDOCUMENTED-LET’S NOT SUGARCOAT THIS). THEY ARE ILLEGAL AND SHOULD BE SENT BACK TO WHERE THEY CAME. THEY ARE DRAINING OUR RESOURCES AND THEY’VE DONE IT THE ILLEGAL WAY! THERE ARE OTHERS WHO ARE TRYING TO DO IT LEGALLY AND HAVE TO WAIT.

    GET THEM OUT. AND NO I’M NOT RACIST.

    THEY ARE ILLEGAL.

  12. susanne sniffin says:

    I agree with the legislation. Students need every opportunity that may be available to them. And I agree an educated person is a benefit to this Country, now and in the future.

  13. Kathy Brown says:

    You must be kidding! Our country is in a financial meltdown. How can we possibly give money to illegal aliens when most middle class people get no break on education and are having to delay or delete plans to send our own American citizens to college? This is a crazy progressive idea that somehow America owes noncitizens a free ride. We are going to be lucky to preserve our own way of life when this recession is over!

  14. ABSOLUTELY, no way to I want the dream act to pass. I appreciate their need, but I’m not supporting people’s illegal entry into this country. It is unfortunate that children have to suffer for their parents lack of honesty, but there is a better way and this act is not it.

  15. RichardMaria Clark says:

    This topic deserves attention! Child marriages are unjust!

  16. Jacqueline Berger says:

    The first priority of an society should be education. Education for all its children. This is the only way in which a society can be healthy, prosperous, and happy. We must stop discrimination in all forms. We must bring and end to backwards ideals and move forward.

  17. Mary Golden says:

    #1. These CHILDREN did not break the law. These girls and boys did not have legal capacity to do so. Many are here because their parents were among our allies in wars in their countries and in danger of reprisal. Or because our insatiable appetite for illegal drugs and profits from uncontrolled arms sales has turned their neighborhoods into war zones.

    #2. These undocumented students who want to go to college are essentially stateless refugee CHILDREN of American culture who are eager to become responsible, productive and economically self-sufficient members of US society. They want to work. Going back to where they were born is not a viable option. Immigrants tend to work harder than other Americans, appreciate the opportunities they have here and want them for their children, and feel proud of America and their contributions to their new homeland.

    #3. For those of you who fear they will help their families immigrate to the US, regulation of sponsors of immigrants is separate from the Dream Act.

    #4. We are all immigrants here, whether we emigrated thousands of years ago from Asia, 400 years ago from Europe, or more recently from all over the world. By every economic measure, one of the primary reasons for US hegemony has been and continues to be immigration.

    #5. Like it or not, Americans who benefit from the theft of our Native American lands and devastation of our culture, these children are not going “home”. America is their home, just as it is ours, however we made it so.

    #6. I support legislation that requires undocumented adult immigrants to pay a fine and comply with other regulations to avoid giving them an unfair advantage over those who were able to get proper documentation before coming here, even though that might have been entirely due to politics. Again, however, the Dream Act is about CHILDREN who had no choice as to whether to immigrate. Put yourself in their shoes and in those of their parents who feared for their children’s lives if they did not leave behind everything they knew and set out for the unknown woefully unprepared—like our forebears.

    The Statue of Liberty is emblazoned with the following words, seared into the hearts of millions of American children in public schools since at least the 1940s when I learned it:

    “Not like the brazen giant of Greek fame,
    With conquering limbs astride from land to land;
    Here at our sea-washed, sunset gates shall stand
    A mighty woman with a torch, whose flame
    Is the imprisoned lightning, and her name
    Mother of Exiles. From her beacon-hand
    Glows world-wide welcome; her mild eyes command
    The air-bridged harbor that twin cities frame.
    ‘Keep, ancient lands, your storied pomp!’ cries she
    With silent lips. ‘Give me your tired, your poor,
    Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
    The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
    Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me,
    I lift my lamp beside the golden door!’”

    by Emma Lazarus, 1883

    This was installed on the monument in 1903, a time of extensive codification of immigration law and prejudice, particularly against the Japanese. In my lifetime, there were signs on Boston lawns reading “No dogs and no Irish.” Anti-Catholic prejudice led to hard times for Irish famine refugees in the 1800s that continued into the 20th century and is a factor in the prejudice against Hispanic immigrants today.

    There is no coda that you are welcome only if you’re from a country to whose citizens we find it politically and economically expedient to grant immigration documents, e.g., yes to El Salvadoreans and no to Haitians, yes to Asian Indians and no to Mexican Indians, yes to German scientists and no to Polish factory workers.

    #7. As every unbiased study reveals, there is a net benefit to the U.S. economy from immigrants. And the vast majority of them do pay taxes, not only sales taxes but employment taxes (unless they are working for employers who pay them off the books to avoid the employer share of such taxes and complying iwth OSHA regulations). They don’t, however, have a way of ever getting that money back as tax refunds or as Social Security for themselves.

    #8. These CHILDREN are not going away. Your choices are: Do you want to support them with your taxes, or do you want them to support themselves, perhaps by earning graduate degrees as Americans in science and technology at U.S. universities that now grant most of them to foreign students, to fill some of the jobs that will otherwise move offshore, and to help pay your Social Security? (Social Security is paid by current workers; it is not a savings account seniors have accumulated and draw upon.)

    #9. Many of you may be familiar with this Biblical parable from Matthew 25:40. This is a related excerpt from a prayer by Mother Teresa in 1994 at a national prayer breakfast focusing on the international Year of the Family in Washington, DC:

    “Jesus makes Himself the hungry one, the naked one, the homeless one, the unwanted one, and He says, ‘You did it to Me.’ On the last day He will say to those on His right, ‘Whatever you did to the least of these, you did to Me, and He will also say to those on His left, whatever you neglected to do for the least of these, you neglected to do it for Me.’…[L]ove of the child…is where love and peace must begin.”

    “If we remember that God loves us, and that we can love others as He loves us, then America can become a sign of peace for the world…. If you become a burning light of justice and peace in the world, then really you will be true to what the founders of this country stood for. God bless you!”

    Love these children and let a thousand flowers bloom!

    [from Mary Golden, Quaker Universalist descendant of Protestant immigrants from Ireland, Scotland, England and France to the Colonies in the 1600s and 1700s, and from the Cherokee from Asia in prehistory]

    • Sandy Kirkpatrick says:

      Thank you, Mary, for such a fabulous exploration of all the reasons we should welcome immigrants in general and these children in particular. I’m proud AAUW is taking a stand in favor of the DREAM Act, which is measured, reasonable and compassionate toward those who grew up identifying themselves as American and who have proven they have something to offer our society. Now if we can get the politicians to stop their games of gotcha long enough to pass it…

  18. Jeanne Evans says:

    I consider myself a liberal woman, 70 yrs. old. I do not consider the DREAM ACT a ‘liberal cause’ at all. In my estimation, it is caving in to illegal residents.

    IF: illegals brought young children with them into the USA, those children, while they may speak unaccented English, are still illegal. AAUW needs to separate itself from support of the DREAM ACT. I have grandchildren who were born to legal US citizens and are now struggling with tuition costs. Let’s help them first! Educate those coming into the USA illegally as to the negative impact their decision to live here illegally has on their children’s cost of higher education.

    Another thought: IF this act passes and all illegals are then college educated, are they then replaced with another generation of incoming illegals to take the low paying positions?

    • Nancy says:

      You are absolutely correct! We need to view our laws
      with intellect rather than emotion. The word illegal
      means just that: illegal.

      “A society that upholds its laws is a strong society”

  19. Joan After says:

    We allow thousands of international students from countries all over the world to attend universities in the US. I am in favor of this and feel we should allow our own foreign students the same privilege.

  20. Mary Jo Rodriguez says:

    Concerning the Dream Act: Wouldn’t it be wonderful if we could exchange some of our native born deadbeats for these ambitious and successful students who are productive non-citizens. They are caught in a dead-end situation because of the often desperate acts of their parents in bringing them into the US when they were too young to protest such trespass. I say if they graduate from college or if they serve in the military and also have no criminal record, let them in!!

    • Anneta Greenlee says:

      I support the cause but I’m really upset about another issue – I mean, girls ages 9 and up being forced into marriages with older men in some places. The non-citizens who study in American universities are ambitious and successful but unfortunately just a lucky minority. How can we protect the others and also girls forced into sexual slavery?

  21. Donna Nielsen says:

    I’m in favor of strongly supporting any way there is to educate – not only women, but everyone. It seems to me that the only way we can take on and solve many of the world problems is to have as many educated people as possible working on them. I worked hard for my education and am so very thankful for the many individuals who helped me acquire it. When we hold anyone back, we hold all of us back. Perhaps the person with the key to a cure for cancer or how to increase the world’s supply of food is the very one we say has no right because of where/when they were born.

  22. Jane says:

    This is absolutely necessary because most of the students I have talked with feel like they were blindsided with this issue of having to pay and also not being eligible for scholarships.

    About sex trafficking: I used to be an AIDS researcher and as such, made sure that we included those in the sex trade. That exposure brought me up front and center to the underage issue. It’s ugly and many of the very youngest girl, I could do the educational piece with, but could not continue to see them on an ongoing basis because their John was frightened of what might happen. He wanted their absolute attention on him and no one else. I saw them and got to interview them once but they were never there or available for follow up.

  23. JEAN says:

    How can men live with themselves if they hurt women and children?

  24. Marlena Lange says:

    We are all immigrants when we study our history. Only the Native Americans can claim thousands of years history to our few centuries.

  25. Unsospiro says:

    This is no different than legalized prostitution of young girls. A sin against humanity, beyond description. It must be stopped.
    We must use the media in any way we can to bring this to the attention of the whole world…

  26. Cyril Robinson says:

    People who are now residents of this country, legal or illegal, if uneducated, are a lliability. Educated residents encourage and assist their children to be educated and to take part in better lives for all. Ignorant residents, citizen or not, lead to poorly thought out decsions that harm the country. Education should be the right and duty of any resident.

  27. Sandra Basgall says:

    Education should be for the masses, not for a select few. If people want their children to receive education that is different from public education, they should have to pay for it themselves and not use my tax dollar. The United States has a long history of public schools which were funded by the citizens and private schools funded by tuition or other ways. To fund private schools means that a minority is being catered to while the majority suffer.

  28. Nancy Leah Dudwick says:

    I support the Dream Act. Throughout the ages immigrants have contributed much to American Society and who is to say that these “so-called illegals” won’t do the same.

  29. Dr Carmen V Rodriguez says:

    I also have serious reservations about Arne Duncan.. Check his background. Believes in “merit pay”, closed local schools instead of improving them, supports voucher schools, etc.

  30. I have always supported public education. Unfortunately in most localities it is supported by property taxes which often leads to inequality. In other places it is supported by school bonds. Some way has to be found to support excellence in all communities whether rich or poor. Betty Jameson

  31. June Alexander says:

    Education is so important – The USA has falled down on helping the schools – so they can do a good job AND encouraging parents to support teachers not make it hard for them to do their calling. Other countries make education very important they encourage their children to go and to do well. Now days the parents of these children were not encouraged; therefore they do not think education is so important. WE ARE MISSING THE BOAT

  32. Wayne says:

    The US global position is built on education, not for just a few but for all. Academic achievement, and the economic stability that follows from that achievement is not unique to wealthy families. If the US is to regain its position as a world leader, it must dedicate itself to providing the best education for all its children. Simply saying it has the best educational system in the world does not make it so.

  33. Rodolfo Cardona says:

    It is as if the Republicans are intent on keeping the American people in ignorance so as they can get their vote, as it happened last November!

  34. Joann Dayton says:

    We are already headed toward the two-tier society, i.e., the wealthy and then the rest of us. Using tax-payer money for private and religious schools will complete the picture.

  35. Anne says:

    Mary Golden, there was such love in your message! It was inspiring. We have had Mexico on our border since this nation was formed. We have aided nations far away to the tune of billions of dollars and we have shrugged our shoulders at Mexico. Our people here have supported the drug cartel there with their habit. There would be no drug cartel there without a market here.

    I wonder how many families who are against the Dream Act would have had the courage to make the dangerous trip across the border to the USA, living the the combative situation of danger so many in Mexico now find themselves because of this drug cartel? Would we have braved those danger for OUR children?

    Many of the foreign students who take seats in our universities and colleges go back to their native land. I doubt that is going to happen with those from across our border-they will use their education here to build lives they could not there. They serve in our military, and have for years-paying the price anyone in the military must pay on active duty-the risk of death, maiming or mental hardship.

    Having talked to those who have come here from Mexico, I knew that they support democracy-they crave it! They appreciate America, rather than take if for granted. They are hard workers, doing jobs most would not do. They harvest our crops, often in horrid conditions, by hand. Your grocery bill would more than double otherwise. Those who are illegal have no legal rights, growers know this and rape the women, deceive with promises and often hold pay that is due. And we, here in America, have allowed this to happen for years! Not until arguments like schooling their children raised its head had we a thought about who was picking the crops, who was doing work others would not do. Isn’t there something a bit hipocrital in this?

  36. Helen Porter says:

    Education should take a top priority.

    The education of all children.

    Our children are our future.

  37. Lynn says:

    Education matters. Children are not responsible for their parents’ country of origin. Why deprive children and teens who see the value of an education?

    I believe in dreams. They are all some people have to keep them going.

    B. Lynn Goodwin
    Author of You Want Me to Do WHAT? Journaling for Caregivers

  38. Kathryn says:

    I disagree with AAUW’s postion on this.
    Our country lags behind in math, science and other areas in spite of huge amounts being spent on education. Competition improves quality.
    I’ve taught high school English. Students are pushed ahead just to keep the numbers game going. I still tutor at-risk students every year to help them pass the state mandated English Language Arts test. Many of these seniors can’t read or critically think. It’s a national scandal.

  39. Marcia Bailey says:

    I want public education to be available for everyone because education helps to make our democracy better. Uneducated people are more likely to be duped or swayed by fake facts. Thinking about what we hear is important because lately a lot of public opinion follows lies that are repeated so often that folks think the lies must be true. Also I want children of illegal immigrants to have a chance for citizenship. We used the labor provided by their parents for years or else they wouldn’t have been raised in this country. Now those who will fight for our country or get educated so that they can contribute should have a chance to be citizens.

  40. Mary Kimball says:

    Let’s support good education for all students, not vouchers for a few!

  41. Audrey Keyes says:

    I’m in education in Milwaukee, WI and we have had vouchers for 10 years. Let me tell you, it does not work!! Our schools have only gotten worse. The public schools have suffered terribly and the voucher schools show no better results despite having a select population.

  42. Heidi Biederman says:

    Those who support vouchers need to understand that if private schools receive public funding, they will no longer be private schools. The voucher money will not come without strings. I think parents should have the true choice of public or private schools.

  43. Lou Ann Vidmanis says:

    Let’s give good education all our children, not only the ones from rich families.

    Let’s support the children/students of illegal families. They deserve education and chances to follow their dreams. Their parents work for us, so give something to these children who need support, not deportation.
    These children may be more intelligent than you think and may contribute much more to the American society than you think.

  44. teri miller says:

    Education is a right and is not for the select few in America. We are concerned about keeping up with the rest of the planet, well, education is the answer.
    It is not for a select few, but for those who desire to improve themselves and our country/world.
    Education is our way of prparing ourselves to be part of a sustainable and cooperative world and life.
    Vouchers limit this sustainment to only a select few. Vouchers have the potential to create an American society of the haves and have nots…this is NOT the American way!

  45. marvin seymour says:

    Lets keep the Dream act in full force across this great nation. Do not let the right wing destroy what we have gained. We all know there are improvements in any system, but to make a radical change as they are doing is un-American.

  46. Gregory Jones says:

    I vote that we keep the Dream Act in full force. The American dream has always been to expand opportunity not to deny it. In fact a philosopher named Doveosky believed that we shouldn’t make little children suffer because their parents decided to bite the fruit. Yea the children might have gotten here illegally, but it still isn’t their fault. The parents decided to eat the fruit not them. This is a fault on our government because they should have explored more effective ways of minimizing illegal entry. Now that they are here, we should deal with it and tighten boarder security to minimize future spending on this issue. Some people would argue that our nation doesn’t have the money to help. Yet, we manage to find 1.3 billion dollars a year to give to the Egyptian government. However my whole point of bringing the philosopher up was to illustrate that people hundreds of years ago had a heart for the children, and we should also. If we are busy denying education to illegal children then we are holding ourselves back and we will never see the potential in these children, or what they could have contributed to society.

  47. Dr Carmen V Rodriguez says:

    In RODRIGUEZ vs EASTCHESTER in 1980 I won a case under Title IX .
    As an art teacher in the middle school I was transferred to an ELEMENTARY school. I was told:”MEN DID NOT TEACH ART IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL”!
    This was a LANDMARK DECISION and is studied at college level.
    It also made in POSSIBLE FOR MEN TO TEACH ART AT ELEMENTARY LEVEL.

    YOUR CONCERN FOR WOMEN’S RIGHTS SHOULD INCLUDE YOUR SUPPORT OF THE ERA!!!

    Carmen Vila Rodriguez, Ed.D.

  48. BEBE ROSS COKER says:

    LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES OF EXCELLENCE FOR ALL CHILDREN IS THE RESPONSIBILITY OF EVERY THINKING AMERICAN. RATHER THAN LABEL SOMEONE A “FELON” (THE OHIO PARENT CASE) FOR TRYING TO OBTAIN QUALITY LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES FOR ONE’S CHILD, THE SCHOOL SYSTEM THAT FAILED TO PROVIDE THESE OPPORTUNITIES SHOULD BE LABELED “FELONIOUS” AND THEIR HOURS OF PROBATIONARY “COMMUNITY SERVICE” SHOULD BE TOWARDS MAKING THE SYSTEM RIGHT FOR ALL CHILDREN. WE HAVE BECOME A NATION OF NUCLEAR GIANTS AND ETHICAL INFANTS. PEACE.

    [Editor's Note: Comment submitted in all caps.]

  49. paulina Bartnik says:

    I would like to tell the New Republican House of Representatives to leave women’s health care alone…women have a right to an abortion if they want…it’s for no one else to decide …it’s her body, her health, her decision. There’s nothing wrong with it if it’s done early in the 1st trimester. After that it should be a little more difficult but, not restricted in any way….of course, some women don’t even know their pregnant till sometimes the 4th or 5th month. Education is the key…sex education should be taught by the parents if not them the schools, protection should be available. Abstinence should be encouraged by all means and if done, done responsibly. Women should have the same rights as men in all health issues….if this goes down this law …they should put more restrictions and penalties for men…like going to jail if they don’t cough up the money to help the women out.
    The Republicons are chipping away at our rights as women…. Paulina Bartnik

  50. Nora Smith says:

    The people that are adament against abortion are the same ones that are against sex education in schools and Planned Parenthood providing contraception services. What a different story it would be if men could get pregnant.

  51. Frances Pierce says:

    This is in response to the new position by AAUW to hold higher education institutions accountable – especially the new “for profit” schools. Once again THANK YOU, AAUW! THESE SCHOOLS ARE A JOKE!!
    This is just another way for the rich to get richer – start your own school – Wow – what a concept!
    Collect all that tuition plus federal assistance money and who cares what you are “teaching” – you can just give a degree and nobody cares about anything further.
    Students in these “schools,” almost all of which are online only, with “virtual” campuses, receive little or no advisement, coaching, mentoring or counseling. They are admitted on their ability to write a check.
    Parents, I hope, will soon get wise to these snake-oil-colleges that promise the moon and deliver “virtually” nothing!

  52. Carlyn says:

    Once again, I find the far right conservatives doing there dirty work, attempting to get rid of Planned Parenthood.
    Education for both female and male is very important, Planned Parenthood can eliminate the need for abortions by great numbers.
    It also helps with health issues etc etc. Support Planned Parenthood, and get rid of those extremists who want to take away rights of women

  53. Teresa Poland says:

    It is time for the Republicans to get out of women’s “crotches” and do what they were elected to do. I feel it is none of their business what we women do,we are not terrorists and have always been a peaceful loving kind. As their husbands are out living it up with other women, which the Repubs know happen a lot, their wives are home caring for their children. I think it is time for Republicans to pay attention to what happens in their own backyard and stay out of all the other womens’ in the US.

  54. ramon & julia hinojosa says:

    in no way or form should amnesty be given to illegal immigrants. no matter how long they have lived here in this country. this would be a slap on the face of those who did it the correct manner. no one should be above the law in this country. any of you go to the country where these people came from illegally and see how fast you get thrown in jail. the same should be done to those who came here illegally, no matter how long they have lived here and work here.

  55. Louise Pierce says:

    I vote regularly and I support family planning and prevention. Please restore the Title X program.

    Thank you.

  56. Sylvia Campbell says:

    I’m tired of the issue of women’s health always being reduced to the topic of abortion. That’s the least of women’s concerns. Family planning, physical counseling, maintaining good health, protection and counseling against sexually transmitted diseases, available, safe contraception–these are all critically important aspects of women’s health. It’s time legislators understood that!

  57. Anne Sherwood says:

    The Republican Congress is so anti women, I wouldn’t be surprised to have them legislate we all wear burkas or bikinis- either would satisfy their slavoring mindset. It certainly holds no RESPECT for women!

    Lets vote the idiots out the next election….that seems the only way to get their agendas off of the table!

  58. JOSETTE BIEHL says:

    I AM 86 YEARS OLD AND ENTERED THIS COUNTRY THROUGH THE IMMIGRATION SYSTEM. MY PARENTS PETITIONED FOR ENTRANCE TO THE USA AND THEY GOT THEIR NUMBER TO ENTER AND WHEN THEIR NUMBER CAME UP, WE CAME IN. MY PARENTS IMMEDIATELY WENT TO NIGHT SCHOOL TO LEARN THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND THE LAW OF THE LAND AND PROCEEDED TOWARD CITIZENSHIP. THEIR FRIENDS DID THE SAME THING. TO ENTER YOU HAD TO PROVE FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY. EITHER SOMEONE VOWED THEIR SUPPORT OF YOU OR YOU SHOWED YOU HAD A JOB.THEY WERE NEVER ON RELIEF, THEY WORKED AND PAID FOR WHAT EVER THEY NEEDED. I FEEL ILLEGALS SHOULD BE RETURNED TO THEIR COUNTRIES OR GO TO JAIL. I TELL YOU THAT YOU WOULD NOT HAVE TO JAIL TOO MANY TO GET THE WORD OUT THAT THE LEGAL WAY IS THE BEST WAY. I WOULD ALSO JAIL & FINE ANY EMPLOYERS OF ILLEGALS. ALSO CUT BACK ALL THOSE WARS. WHY DO WE HAVE TO FIGHT EVERYONE’S BATTLES AT THE EXPENSE OF OUR OWN CITIZENS.

  59. Mary Obasi says:

    Everybody in this country should have opportunity for education to the highest level possible. that will produce better citizens, better community, and better economy.

  60. Joan Weinstein says:

    Please pass the AMERICAN bill to help students, who will enhance our country after they receive a good education.

  61. Dr. Douglas Ann Newsom says:

    Education for everyone is the way to preserve a civil and democratic society. If you truly care about this country, educate everyone
    in it.

    Dr. Doug Newsom

  62. Winifred E. Green says:

    I believe everyone in the world today needs a good education because of all the new complications. I support any law supporting education and helping immigrants.

  63. Daniel Scheinhaus says:

    Before typing this, I read the comments already made. It says a lot that few writers don’t want to help kids who are here from other lands through no fault of their own. One of these, Josette, has shown herself to be an uncaring, ignorant person in several ways. She plainly doesn’t know why her parents came, bringing her. I’m the son of immigrants, 78 years old. My parents each came at separate times. I was lucky to be born here in the U.S. I’m also a veteran. I took the time to learn why my parents came. I realize that, often, people come out of desperation. When children aren’t so lucky, yet are brought here, they shouldn’t be punished for a decision that wasn’t theirs. In fact, desperate adults shouldn’t be punished either. Kids should have a chance to learn well, as Josette didn’t bother doing.

  64. Berta B. Kapoor says:

    It’s a shame if our students in public school are not protected. I urge the vote versus HR 471. Public school is extremerly important and should be subsidized by the government of these United States of America.
    Private schools are private and therefore there is no need to subsidize them.

  65. Cora Biernat says:

    Women have done so many things to help make the world a better place so they deserve a museum about the women who have contributed to the world. All women have an important share in a museum that recognizes their contributions. It was a Bentz woman that created the steam iron. We use that a lot these days. And look at all of the other women who have done something. What a great idea.

    • ann smith gray says:

      I have personally tried for yrs. to help establish a womens history museum. when I chaired the atlantic county womens commission, we tried. we sent a letter asking rep. frank lobiondo to help. he did absoultely nothing & did not even deign to reply. once “our” representatives get in office, it is their “own” agenda, ie. what best promotes them, that they follow. sad & terribly frustrating, but so far that has been our experience.

  66. Barbara Sherard says:

    The idea of a museum celebrating the women of US is admirable. Maybe it should be near the Museum of Women in the Arts which is off the mall but not far. They took over an old beautiful building and have made the area noteable with contributions keeping it going.

  67. Nancy Hollland says:

    We must keep the unions for women, who still haven’t received their fair share! Look how many women are in middle and top management in business, in “think tanks” and other leadership groups, such as military decisions, that affect the decisions that affect our country.

  68. Alise O. Irwin says:

    RE: Women’s History Museum. Just how will the proposed museum be different from the National Women’s History Museum and Historical Park at Seneca Falls, NY? I know that the anticipated new site is to be in Washington, DC – but exactly how is DC particularly significant to the long and often painful history of women’s rights in the US?

    I suggest that everyone watch – and think about – two films on the subject. One is a commercial film, “IRON – JAWED ANGELS”, and the second, less well-known, is “SENECA FALLS”. Both are important to any discussion and action on the subject of Women’s history!

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